10 popular plants in front of New York office (p.2)

Eastman Dang
21 Min Read

(Please read part 1 of this article if you do not read yet, as following)

10 popular plants in front of New York office (p.1)

Ornamental Grasses: Grasses like Fountain Grass (Pennisetum spp.) or Maiden Grass (Miscanthus spp.) provide texture and movement to the landscape.

Planting ornamental grasses is a straightforward process, and they can add texture, movement, and interest to your garden or landscape. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting ornamental grasses:

popular plants in front of New York office
Ornamental Grasses
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant ornamental grasses is in the early spring or fall. Planting during these seasons allows the grasses to establish their root system before facing extreme temperatures.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Most ornamental grasses prefer full sun, but some varieties can tolerate partial shade. Ensure the planting area has well-draining soil to prevent waterlogged conditions.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Ornamental grasses can adapt to various soil types, but loosening the soil to a depth of 6 to 8 inches and adding organic matter like compost can improve soil structure and fertility.
  4. Choose the Right Grass: Select ornamental grass varieties that are well-suited to your climate and growing conditions. Popular choices include Fountain Grass (Pennisetum spp.), Maiden Grass (Miscanthus spp.), and Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).
  5. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is slightly wider and at the same depth as the root ball of the ornamental grass. The hole should be big enough to accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  6. Plant the Grass: Gently remove the ornamental grass from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the grass in the center of the hole, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with the surrounding soil.
  7. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the grass thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  8. Spacing: Space ornamental grasses according to their mature size. Some grasses require more room to spread, while others can be planted closer together for a dense effect.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the ornamental grass, but avoid covering the crown. Mulch helps retain soil moisture and suppresses weed growth.
  10. Watering and Care: Newly planted ornamental grasses need regular watering to help establish their root system. Once established, they are generally drought-tolerant and require minimal watering.
  11. Pruning and Maintenance: Prune ornamental grasses in late winter or early spring before new growth emerges. Cut back the old foliage to a few inches above the ground to make way for new growth.
  12. Division: Ornamental grasses can become overcrowded over time. To maintain their vigor and prevent them from taking over the garden, divide the clumps every few years.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your ornamental grasses should thrive and enhance the beauty of your landscape with their graceful and architectural presence.

Knock Out Roses (Rosa ‘Knock Out’): These low-maintenance roses offer continuous blooms throughout the growing season and come in various colors.


Planting Knock Out Roses (Rosa ‘Knock Out’) is a straightforward process, and these low-maintenance roses are known for their continuous blooming and disease resistance. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting Knock Out Roses:

popular plants in front of New York office
Rosa ‘Knock Out’
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant Knock Out Roses is in the early spring or fall when the weather is cooler, and the plants can establish their root system before facing extreme temperatures.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Knock Out Roses prefer a location with full sun to thrive and produce abundant blooms. Choose a spot with well-draining soil to prevent waterlogged conditions.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Amend the soil with organic matter like compost to improve its structure and fertility.
  4. Choose Healthy Plants: Select healthy Knock Out Rose plants from a reputable nursery or garden center. Look for plants with green leaves, no signs of disease or damage, and well-developed root systems.
  5. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is slightly wider and at the same depth as the root ball of the Knock Out Rose. The hole should be big enough to accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  6. Plant the Rose: Gently remove the Knock Out Rose from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the center of the hole, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with the surrounding soil.
  7. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the rose thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  8. Spacing: Space Knock Out Roses about 3 to 4 feet apart to allow adequate air circulation and prevent overcrowding as they grow.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the Knock Out Rose, but avoid piling it against the stem. Mulch helps retain soil moisture, regulate temperature, and suppresses weed growth.
  10. Watering and Care: Newly planted Knock Out Roses need regular watering to establish their root system. Once established, they are relatively drought-tolerant, but it’s essential to water during dry spells.
  11. Pruning and Deadheading: Knock Out Roses benefit from regular deadheading, which is removing faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming. Prune the bushes in late winter or early spring to shape and remove dead or diseased wood.
  12. Fertilizing: Knock Out Roses are not heavy feeders but can benefit from a balanced fertilizer application in the spring and again in mid-summer.
  13. Pest and Disease Control: Knock Out Roses are generally disease-resistant, but keep an eye out for common rose pests like aphids or Japanese beetles and take appropriate action if needed.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your Knock Out Roses should reward you with beautiful blooms throughout the growing season, enhancing the beauty of your garden.

Yew Shrubs (Taxus spp.): Yews are hardy evergreen shrubs that can create a formal and elegant look in front of the office.

Planting yew shrubs (Taxus spp.) is really easy, and these evergreen plants are known for their dense, dark green foliage and ability to thrive in various conditions. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting yew shrubs:

popular plants in front of New York office
Yew Shrubs
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant yew shrubs is in the early spring or fall. Planting during these seasons allows the shrubs to establish their root system before facing extreme temperatures.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Yew shrubs can tolerate a range of light conditions, from full sun to full shade, but they prefer partial shade. Choose a spot with well-draining soil to prevent waterlogged conditions.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Yews prefer fertile soil, so amend the soil with organic matter like compost to improve its structure and nutrient content.
  4. Choose Healthy Plants: Select healthy yew shrubs from a reputable nursery or garden center. Look for plants with vibrant green foliage, no signs of disease or damage, and well-developed root systems.
  5. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is slightly wider and at the same depth as the root ball of the yew shrub. The hole should be big enough to accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  6. Plant the Yew: Gently remove the yew shrub from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the center of the hole, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with the surrounding soil.
  7. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the shrub thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  8. Spacing: Space yew shrubs according to their mature size. Some yew varieties can grow quite large, so consider their growth potential when determining spacing.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the yew shrub, but avoid piling it against the stem. Mulch helps retain soil moisture, regulate temperature, and suppresses weed growth.
  10. Watering and Care: Newly planted yew shrubs need regular watering to establish their root system. Once established, they are relatively drought-tolerant, but it’s essential to water during dry spells.
  11. Pruning: Yew shrubs generally require minimal pruning. You can trim them lightly in late spring or early summer to maintain their shape and encourage dense growth.
  12. Fertilizing: Yew shrubs are not heavy feeders, but you can apply a balanced fertilizer in the spring to promote healthy growth.
  13. Pest and Disease Control: Yew shrubs are generally pest-resistant, but keep an eye out for common issues like scale insects or fungal diseases and take appropriate action if needed.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your yew shrubs should thrive and provide year-round beauty with their dense and attractive foliage.

Coneflowers (Echinacea): Coneflowers are attractive perennials that not only add beauty to the landscape but also attract pollinators like butterflies and bees.

These beautiful, native perennial flowers are well-loved for their vibrant blooms and ability to attract pollinators. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting coneflowers:

popular plants in front of New York office
Coneflowers
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant coneflowers is in the spring or fall. Planting during these seasons allows the flowers to establish their root system before facing extreme temperatures.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Coneflowers thrive in full sun, so choose a spot that receives at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight per day. They also prefer well-draining soil but can tolerate a range of soil types.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Amend the soil with organic matter like compost to improve its structure and fertility.
  4. Choose Healthy Plants: Select healthy coneflower plants from a reputable nursery or garden center. Look for plants with strong stems, healthy foliage, and no signs of disease or damage.
  5. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is slightly wider and at the same depth as the root ball of the coneflower. The hole should be big enough to accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  6. Plant the Coneflower: Gently remove the coneflower from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the center of the hole, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with the surrounding soil.
  7. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the plant thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  8. Spacing: Space coneflowers about 18 to 24 inches apart to allow enough room for the plants to grow and spread.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as wood chips or straw, around the base of the coneflower. Mulch helps retain soil moisture and suppresses weed growth.
  10. Watering and Care: Newly planted coneflowers need regular watering to establish their root system. Once established, they are relatively drought-tolerant, but it’s essential to water during dry spells.
  11. Deadheading: Deadhead the faded flowers regularly by removing them just below the flower head. This encourages continuous blooming and prevents self-seeding.
  12. Fertilizing: Coneflowers don’t require heavy fertilization. You can apply a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in the spring to provide essential nutrients.
  13. Pest and Disease Control: Coneflowers are generally resistant to pests and diseases, but keep an eye out for issues like aphids or powdery mildew and take appropriate action if needed.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your coneflowers should thrive and reward you with beautiful, colorful blooms that attract butterflies and bees to your garden.

Sedums: Sedums are drought-tolerant and low-maintenance plants that can thrive in various front-of-office conditions, including dry and sunny areas.

These drought-tolerant succulents are known for their low maintenance and attractive appearance. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting sedums:

popular plants in front of New York office
Sedums
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant sedums is in the spring or early summer when the soil is warming up, and the plants can establish their root system before facing extreme heat.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Sedums thrive in full sun to light shade. Choose a spot with well-draining soil, as they are susceptible to rot in waterlogged conditions.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Sedums prefer lean soil, so avoid excessive fertilization. If your soil is heavy or clayey, consider amending it with coarse sand or perlite to improve drainage.
  4. Choose Healthy Plants: Select healthy sedum plants from a reputable nursery or garden center. Look for plants with plump, firm leaves and no signs of damage or disease.
  5. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is slightly wider and at the same depth as the root ball of the sedum. The hole should be big enough to accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  6. Plant the Sedum: Gently remove the sedum from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the center of the hole, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with the surrounding soil.
  7. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the plant thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  8. Spacing: Space sedums according to their mature size. Most sedum varieties will spread, so ensure there is enough room for them to grow and fill in the space.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of gravel or small pebbles around the base of the sedum. Mulching with gravel helps retain soil moisture and prevents weed growth while allowing water to drain quickly.
  10. Watering and Care: Newly planted sedums need regular watering to establish their root system. Once established, they are drought-tolerant and require minimal watering. Avoid overwatering, as sedums prefer dry conditions.
  11. Pruning: Sedums generally require minimal pruning. You can remove spent flowers and trim back leggy growth in late fall or early spring to promote a more compact form.
  12. Propagation: Sedums are easy to propagate. You can divide mature plants in the spring or take stem cuttings and root them in well-draining soil.
  13. Pest and Disease Control: Sedums are relatively pest and disease-resistant, but keep an eye out for common issues like aphids or mealybugs and treat them accordingly.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your sedums should thrive and create a beautiful and resilient display in your garden or landscape.

Conclusion

In conclusion, planting a variety of popular plants in front of a New York office can enhance the aesthetics and improve the overall atmosphere of the space. By carefully selecting a mix of trees, shrubs, and perennials suitable for the local climate and growing conditions, the front area can become a welcoming and visually appealing environment. The combination of colorful flowers, lush foliage, and attractive textures will provide a pleasing contrast to the urban surroundings, bringing a touch of nature to the bustling cityscape.

Additionally, incorporating low-maintenance and drought-tolerant plants like Knock Out Roses, Boxwood Shrubs, and Sedums will ensure that the landscaping remains visually stunning without requiring excessive upkeep. Native plants, such as Coneflowers and Yew Shrubs, can further benefit the local ecosystem by attracting pollinators and providing shelter for wildlife.

Strategically arranging these plants and incorporating features like ornamental grasses or Japanese Maple trees will create a visually cohesive and harmonious landscape design. By selecting plants that bloom at different times throughout the year, the front area will experience a continuous display of colors and textures, brightening up the office environment and leaving a positive impression on employees and visitors alike.

In addition to their aesthetic appeal, these plants offer numerous environmental benefits, including air purification, carbon sequestration, and temperature moderation, which can contribute to a healthier and more sustainable workplace.

Overall, by incorporating a diverse selection of popular plants in front of a New York office, businesses can create an inviting and attractive outdoor space that not only boosts employee morale but also presents a positive image to clients and the community. The well-maintained and thoughtfully designed landscaping will serve as a testament to the company’s commitment to sustainability and contribute to a more vibrant and eco-friendly urban landscape.

Read previous part 1: 10 popular plants in front of New York office (p.1)

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