10 popular plants in front of New York office (p.1)

Eastman Dang
19 Min Read

Introduction

When selecting plants for the front of a New York office, it’s essential to consider the local climate and available light conditions. Here’s a list of 10 popular plants in front of New York office that can thrive (part 1).

Flowering Cherry Trees (Prunus serrulata): These ornamental trees showcase beautiful blossoms in the spring, adding a touch of elegance to the office entrance.

Planting flowering cherry trees requires careful consideration of the location, soil preparation, and proper planting techniques. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting flowering cherry trees:

Popular plants in front of New York office
Cherry Trees
  1. Choose the Right Location: Select a sunny spot with well-draining soil for your cherry tree. Flowering cherry trees thrive in full sunlight and prefer slightly acidic to neutral soil.
  2. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Loosen the soil in the planting area to a depth of at least 12-18 inches (30-45 cm) to allow the roots to penetrate easily.
  3. Test Soil pH: Flowering cherry trees prefer slightly acidic to neutral soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. You can test the soil pH using a soil testing kit available at most garden centers.
  4. Choose the Right Tree: Purchase a healthy flowering cherry tree from a reputable nursery or garden center. Look for a tree with a well-developed root system, no signs of disease or damage, and a straight, central leader.
  5. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is twice as wide as the tree’s root ball and slightly shallower. The hole should accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  6. Remove the Tree from the Container: Gently remove the tree from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. If the tree is in a biodegradable pot, you can plant it directly without removing the pot.
  7. Inspect and Prune the Roots: Check the tree’s roots and prune any damaged or circling roots to encourage outward growth.
  8. Place the Tree in the Hole: Position the tree in the center of the hole and make sure it is at the same level as the surrounding ground. Avoid planting the tree too deep, as this can lead to root rot.
  9. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with the soil you removed earlier, gently tamping it down to remove air pockets. Water the tree as you backfill to help settle the soil around the roots.
  10. Create a Watering Basin: Build a small basin around the base of the tree to retain water during irrigation.
  11. Water the Tree: After planting, water the tree thoroughly to ensure the soil is evenly moist. Cherry trees need regular watering, especially during dry periods.
  12. Mulch the Base: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the tree, but avoid piling it against the trunk. Mulch helps retain moisture and suppresses weed growth.
  13. Stake if Necessary: If your tree is top-heavy or in a windy area, you may need to stake it temporarily to provide support until it establishes its root system.
  14. Prune Dead or Diseased Branches: After planting, inspect the tree for any dead or diseased branches and prune them to promote healthy growth.

With proper care, your flowering cherry tree should establish itself and reward you with beautiful blooms in the spring. Regular watering, mulching, and occasional fertilizing will help it thrive in its new home.

Boxwood Shrubs (Buxus): Boxwoods are evergreen shrubs that offer a classic and polished look to the front of the office year-round.

Planting boxwood shrubs (Buxus) involves careful preparation and consideration of the planting site. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting boxwood shrubs:

Popular plants in front of New York office
Boxwood Shrubs
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant boxwood shrubs is in the early spring or fall when the weather is cooler, and the plants can establish their root systems before facing extreme temperatures.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Boxwood shrubs prefer well-draining soil and partial to full sun. Choose a location with good air circulation to help prevent diseases.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Boxwood shrubs thrive in fertile, loamy soil. Before planting, amend the soil with organic matter such as compost to improve drainage and nutrient content.
  4. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is slightly wider and deeper than the root ball of the boxwood shrub. The hole should be large enough to accommodate the roots without crowding or bending them.
  5. Remove the Plant from the Container: Gently remove the boxwood shrub from its container by tapping the sides and bottom. Carefully loosen the roots if they are pot-bound.
  6. Inspect and Trim Roots: Check the roots for any damaged or circling roots and trim them to encourage outward growth.
  7. Plant the Shrub: Place the boxwood shrub in the center of the hole, making sure it sits at the same level as it was in the container. Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down to remove air pockets.
  8. Water Thoroughly: After planting, water the shrub thoroughly to settle the soil and ensure the roots make good contact with the surrounding soil.
  9. Apply Mulch: Add a layer of organic mulch around the base of the shrub, but avoid piling it against the trunk. Mulch helps retain soil moisture and suppress weed growth.
  10. Watering and Care: Boxwood shrubs require regular watering, especially during dry periods. Provide adequate water during the first year to help the plant establish its root system. After that, water the shrub as needed to maintain soil moisture.
  11. Pruning: Regular pruning can help shape and maintain the boxwood shrub’s desired size and appearance. Prune in late spring or early summer to avoid promoting new growth before the winter months.
  12. Fertilizing: Boxwood shrubs generally benefit from a balanced fertilizer applied in the early spring and again in late summer.
  13. Pest and Disease Control: Keep an eye out for pests and diseases that can affect boxwood shrubs. Regular inspection and prompt action can help prevent or mitigate issues.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your boxwood shrubs should thrive and add beauty to your landscape for years to come.

Daylilies (Hemerocallis): Daylilies are hardy and colorful perennials that can brighten up the front of the office during the summer months.

Planting daylilies (Hemerocallis) is a straightforward process, and they are a great addition to any garden due to their beautiful and vibrant blooms. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting daylilies:

Popular plants in front of New York office
Daylilies
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant daylilies is in the early spring or fall. Avoid planting during the hot summer months to prevent stress on the plants.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Daylilies prefer well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. Choose a location with at least 6 hours of sunlight per day for optimal growth and blooming.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Daylilies are adaptable to various soil types but thrive in fertile, loamy soil. Before planting, amend the soil with organic matter like compost to improve its texture and nutrient content.
  4. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is wide and deep enough to accommodate the daylily’s root system without bending or crowding the roots. The hole should be about twice the size of the root ball.
  5. Plant the Daylily: Gently remove the daylily from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the center of the hole, spreading out the roots evenly. The crown (where the roots meet the stems) should be at or slightly above ground level.
  6. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to eliminate air pockets. Water the newly planted daylily thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  7. Spacing: Space daylilies about 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety and the desired density of the planting.
  8. Watering and Care: Daylilies are generally low-maintenance plants but require regular watering during the first few weeks after planting to help establish their root system. After that, they are relatively drought-tolerant.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the daylilies, but avoid covering the crown. Mulch helps retain moisture, suppresses weeds, and moderates soil temperature.
  10. Fertilizing: Daylilies benefit from a balanced fertilizer applied in the early spring before new growth appears. Avoid excessive nitrogen, as it can encourage foliage growth at the expense of flowering.
  11. Deadheading: To encourage prolonged blooming, remove faded flowers by cutting the flower stalk at the base. This process, called deadheading, redirects energy back to the plant rather than seed production.
  12. Division: Daylilies can become crowded over time, leading to reduced blooming. To maintain their vigor, divide the clumps every 3 to 5 years in early spring or fall.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your daylilies should thrive and reward you with beautiful blooms throughout the growing season.

Hostas (Hosta spp.): These shade-loving plants have attractive foliage and are well-suited for planting in areas with limited direct sunlight.

Planting hostas (Hosta spp.) is a simple and rewarding process, as these shade-loving perennials add beauty and lush foliage to gardens. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting hostas:

Popular plants in front of New York office
Hostas (Hosta Plantain Lily)
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant hostas is in the early spring or fall when the soil is moist and the weather is cooler. Planting during these times allows the hostas to establish their root system before facing hot summer temperatures.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Hostas thrive in shady to partially shady areas with well-draining soil. Avoid planting them in full sun, as it can cause the leaves to scorch or wilt.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Hostas prefer fertile, humus-rich soil. Before planting, amend the soil with organic matter like compost to improve its texture and nutrient content.
  4. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is wide and deep enough to accommodate the hosta’s root system comfortably. The hole should be slightly larger than the root ball.
  5. Plant the Hosta: Gently remove the hosta from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the center of the hole, ensuring that the crown (where the roots meet the stems) is at or just below ground level.
  6. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the newly planted hosta thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  7. Spacing: Space hostas at least 1 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety and the desired density of the planting. Some larger hosta varieties may need more space.
  8. Watering and Care: Hostas require regular watering during the first few weeks after planting to help establish their root system. Once established, they are relatively low-maintenance and can tolerate dry periods.
  9. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the hostas, but avoid piling it against the crown. Mulch helps retain moisture, suppresses weeds, and regulates soil temperature.
  10. Fertilizing: Hostas benefit from a balanced fertilizer applied in the early spring as new growth emerges. Avoid excessive nitrogen, as it can lead to lush foliage but reduced flowering.
  11. Slug Control: Hostas are susceptible to slug damage, especially in humid or moist environments. Consider using organic slug repellents or other control methods to protect your plants.
  12. Division: Over time, hostas can become crowded and may produce fewer flowers. To maintain their vigor, divide the clumps every few years in early spring or fall.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your hostas should thrive and create a beautiful and lush display in your garden. Remember to choose the right variety for your specific growing conditions and enjoy the lovely foliage these perennials provide.

Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum): Japanese maple trees are known for their stunning foliage, adding a touch of grace and beauty to the office entrance.

Planting a Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum) is a delightful and rewarding process. These elegant trees are known for their stunning foliage and make a beautiful addition to any garden or landscape. Japanese maples are a subspecies, is an evergreen shrub that thrives in USDA. Here’s a step-by-step guide to planting a Japanese Maple:

Popular plants in front of New York office
Japanese Maple
  1. Choose the Right Time: The best time to plant a Japanese Maple is in the fall or spring when the weather is cooler and the tree is dormant. Avoid planting during the hot summer months to reduce stress on the tree.
  2. Select a Suitable Location: Japanese Maples prefer a location with dappled or filtered sunlight. They thrive in well-draining, slightly acidic to neutral soil. Avoid planting in areas with strong winds or extreme temperatures.
  3. Prepare the Soil: Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Amend the soil with organic matter like compost to improve its texture and nutrient content.
  4. Dig the Planting Hole: Dig a hole that is wider and slightly shallower than the tree’s root ball. The hole should be big enough to accommodate the roots without bending or crowding.
  5. Plant the Japanese Maple: Gently remove the Japanese Maple from its container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the tree in the center of the hole, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with or just slightly above the surrounding soil.
  6. Backfill the Hole: Fill the hole with soil, gently pressing it down around the roots to remove air pockets. Water the tree thoroughly to help settle the soil.
  7. Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as wood chips or bark, around the base of the tree. Mulch helps retain soil moisture and regulate temperature, creating a favorable environment for the roots.
  8. Watering and Care: Japanese Maples require regular watering during the first year after planting to help establish their root system. Once established, they are relatively low-maintenance trees.
  9. Pruning: Prune Japanese Maples minimally and only to remove dead or damaged branches. Avoid heavy pruning, especially in the first few years after planting.
  10. Protection from Harsh Conditions: Provide protection from strong winds and extreme temperatures, especially in the first year after planting, to help the tree establish itself.
  11. Fertilizing: Japanese Maples generally don’t require heavy fertilization. You can apply a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in the spring to provide essential nutrients.
  12. Monitor for Pests and Diseases: Keep an eye out for any signs of pests or diseases, and take prompt action if any issues arise.

By following these steps and providing proper care, your Japanese Maple should thrive and showcase its stunning foliage, adding beauty and elegance to your landscape for many years to come.

When selecting plants, consider their mature size and growth habits to ensure they fit well in the available space. It’s also essential to maintain the plants regularly by watering, pruning, and fertilizing as needed to keep the front of the office looking vibrant and inviting.

Continue >>> 10 popular plants in front of New York office (p.2)

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